Breads & Brioches

  • Three Day Classic French Croissants

    by Audrey

    This three-day version of my Classic French Croissant is the real deal! There are no shortcuts, but you will achieve the closest thing to real French Bakery Croissants (if not the same). The three days necessary for the process offers the proper time for the dough to develop, relax and build a rich complexity in taste and texture. A great weekend project, worth every effort and minute! In comparison to my One-day or Two-day Classic French Croissants recipe, these will have the flakiest outside, most aerated crumb and have the…

  • Rye and Buckwheat Honey French Spice Bread

    by Audrey

    This Pain d’épices (French for “Spice Bread”) is an iconic French bread associated with the city of Reims, and beloved all over France. It is sold in bakeries, grocery stores, and of course in every Christmas market around the country. As per tradition, a real French Spice Bread should be made with only rye flour, and dark buckwheat honey as a sweetener (no sugar). You won’t find any butter in it, as it is indeed a bread – not a cake – far less sweet and much drier than its American…

  • Beer and Cheddar Welsh from Hauts-de-France

    by Audrey

    Behold this winter-perfect dish: A scrumptious Beer and Cheddar Welsh, just like they make in Northern French brasseries. Now, you might have already heard of the Welsh Rarebit – a typical specialty from Wales – that is a combination of toasted bread and melted cheese. But did you know that this is insanely popular in the north of France too? This popular French dish hails from the Hauts-de-France, where they simply call it “Le Welsh”, and it is just a bit different than the actual Welsh version (and a bit more…

  • Hot-Buttered Soft Pretzels (Bretzels)

    by Audrey

    With Oktoberfest celebrations nearly upon us, behold these Alsatian classics: hot buttered soft pretzels! Or, should I say, Bretzels – as that’s how you’ll find them called in Alsace. These salt-topped chewy twists are one of the most iconic culinary treats of the region (if not the treat!). Now, if you live in Alsace, you may not find the point in making homemade pretzels, as they can literally be found in any food market, bakery and even “bretzellerie” (street shops devoted to making and selling only bretzels).

  • Chickpea Flatbread from Provence (Socca)

    by Audrey

    This chickpea flatbread (known as “socca”) is a little culinary treasure hailing from the sun-kissed Ligurian Coast, stretching from Italy to France. Naturally vegan and gluten-free, this delectable and rustic chick pea flatbread has seen a big revival in these past few years. But its recipe is truly as ancient as can be – and very, very easy. In Italy, from Ventimiglia to La Spezia, it is known as the “farinata”. In the Piemonte Region, people call it the “belecàuda” (meaning literally, beautiful and hot).  And in the South of…

  • Cherry Bread Pudding from Brittany

    by Audrey

    Known in French as “Le Fouesnantais”, this Cherry Bread Pudding recipe originates from Fouesnant, a small town in Brittany where cherries are a big part of the local economy. Filled with clusters of cherries and topped with a fragrant cinnamon crumble, it is rich and satisfying with bursts of sweetness (and it makes great use of whichever leftover brioche, pain au lait or bread you might have on hand!)

  • Double-Chocolate Mashed-Potato Brioche (GF)

    by Audrey

    If you think “brioche” is one of those intimidating French staples that you’ll never be able to make at home… think again! This double-chocolate mashed potato brioche recipe from the Wickaninnish Cookbook is a quick and nifty version that is deliciously creamy, chocolatey and gluten-free. And it’s just one of the many exquisite recipes you’ll find in this book …

  • Classic Pain de Mie

    by Audrey

    All crumb, with little crust. I know this might not be the idea you have of a classic French bread, but it is the best way to describe this Pain de mie, which is a delicious French household staple in France. Now the truth is, while growing up in France, I was not particularly fond of this style of bread. Pain de Mie is sold in every French supermarket and grocery store, sliced and packaged. And seeing these industrial-like, pre-packaged and sliced soft white breads is a vision that never…

  • No-knead Dutch Oven Nutty Boule

    by Audrey

    When you’re preparing to host a Christmas dinner in France, the choice of the bread(s) is as important as any course you will be serving. Usually each course gets accompanied by a different bread, each thoughfully paired with the food. Spice bread slices get toasted and served with foie gras. Dark breads such as rye or a viking banette get served with smoked salmon and seafood. Simple baguettes or rustic baguettes (such as traditon, festival or a meule de pierre) usually get served with the main dish.

  • Honey and Citrus Spiced Bread, Michalak-Style

    by Audrey

    What would a French Holiday Season be without a few slices of delicious Spiced Bread? Fragrant, sweet and comforting, it is simply a must. This recipe, by French Pastry Chef Michalak, combines sweet honey with bright citrus flavors, and is perfectly spiced. A pure pleasure!

This website uses cookies to improve your experience & support our mission. By using our site, you agree to our use of cookies. Accept